I'm Jason Firth.

Recently, there was a fatality in the news, as an Uber automated vehicle hit a pedestrian who was crossing the road.

The circumstances seem to be that the pedestrian carrying a bike crossed the road without seeing the car, and the car basically drove right into the young woman.

A lot of people seemed shocked that the car didn't recognise the young woman was there, and didn't immediately brake or swerve. One person invoked "fail safety", the idea that equipment should always default to the safest state.

This case is, in my estimation, more complicated than you'd think. It's true you want things to fail safe, but it isn't always clear what a fail safe state is.

I'll give you an example.

In a commonly told but apocryphal story, boiler maintenance was being done at the paper mill in Fort Frances Ontario Canada. (You've heard this story from me before) The design of a boiler (at least a recovery boiler like this) is you have tubes filled with water and steam surrounding a combustion chamber. Usually, you'll have a drum called the mud drum that contains a certain level of water. If that level is too low, that's normally considered an emergency situation. In this case, the maintenance they were doing required the mud drum to be empty, and they were still firing the boiler.

The story goes, a new operator came on shift and saw the mud drum was empty and immediately panicked. The operator immediately opened the water valves wide open (what would normally be considered 'fail safe'), and the boiler immediately exploded.

Why did that happen? What happened is the boiler tubes were red hot and virtually unpressurised. When cold water hit the tubes, the water immediately caused an explosive release of steam which caused an explosion. While the involvement of a person is unusual, boilers routinely experience explosions due to water valves having problems like this. If the boiler was running under normal conditions, perhaps dumping water into the tubes would be a safe option -- cooling everything and getting everything to a zero energy state faster.

So despite the valve opening being what you'd normally consider a 'fail safe' state, in this case it was a dangerous action to take.

Let's assume for a moment that both the car and the driver had perfect vision in that moment, and saw the pedestrian long before the moment of impact.

What is the safest action to take if you see someone crossing the street? Everyone here is immediately saying "obviously slam the brakes and swerve!", but let's think about that for a second. Most people are not going to walk directly into the path of an oncoming vehicle. Even if crossing, you'd expect a person to stop, so you can't necessarily use the fact that there's a person there to predict what's going to happen. By contrast, what happens if you slam the brakes and swerve every time you see someone crossing the street a little too close? If there's a car near you, it could cause an accident. If the person was going to stop, then that person could end up getting hit by your actions where they might not otherwise. The driver or passengers in the car might be injured -- probably for nothing, because 99 times out of 100, the person will stop before the car hits them. Often, the safest act is to do nothing.

Here's where there is a divergence between the powers of an AI, and the powers of a human. An AI sees object 15 -- perhaps even a human on bike type object -- travelling at a certain speed at a certain vector. It has to figure out what it can from relatively limited information. By contrast, a human sees a sketchy looking lady walking in a strange way not paying attention. The AI might not recognise there's a threat, whereas the human might recognise something isn't right and take the opportunity to take some of those more aggressive defensive manoeuvres for this isolated case. It isn't just object types and vectors, it's a vivid world of information and context.

Our powers of intuition, empathy, and deduction are much more than we give ourselves credit for. We know more than any purpose built AI, and can make connections that no purpose built AI presently can. Humans aren't perfect, but there's reasons why we still have humans involved with even the most high tech processes.

It's ironic to say this as an automation guy, but the world is about to realize the limitations of automation, as it comes closer and closer to our personal lives.

As interesting as this story is on it's own, I feel it's also interesting to show the limitations of raw automation in the industrial context as well. Sometimes, operations asks for a system that reacts to something the human knows but the machine does not. If you're not careful, you cause false positives and react dramatically to situations that don't exist based on assumptions, causing more problems than you'd prevent.

One I saw for a while was an operator pointing to a spike on a graph and going "That's because of [event], we need to prevent that." Then you'd go down the graph and find another spike and go "Is this [event]?", they'd say "no". You'd go down a little further and say "how about this? Is this [event]?", and they'd say "no". It turns out that the reason the operator knows what's going on is that the operator is a human with eyes and ears and an incredibly versatile mind that can understand things far beyond a series of numbers plotted along a graph. Short of dramatic changes to the process, the PLC can't know that [event] has occurred with any sort of certainty.

Thanks for reading!